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Ross Oleza, Julita

Born in Arecibo, Puerto Rico on 21 March, 1919, Julita Ross was known as the “Dama de la danza”, or “Lady of the danza”. She moved to Santurce when she was four years old, studying at Central High Schoool there.

By age 21, her sweet and smooth voice and romantic style, brought her to a career as a vocalist, singing on radio shows in Puerto Rico. Her promising career was launched with the help of the famous cuatro master, El Maestro Ladi with whom she performed. With the onset of the Second World War, Ross entertained troops at the training camps throughout the island with the orchestra of Abdías Villalonga, which helped her gain notoriety as a performer. After the war, Ross moved on to New York where she continued singing on the radio as well as in night clubs and theaters.

Ross made her first recording in 1947, of a bolero: Diez Años, by the legendary Puerto Rican songwriter, Rafael Hernández. She subsequently recorded many others, including “No Me Escribas”, composed by Juan Caruso and which most representative of her unique style. This was re-released as Julita Ross - No Me Escribas on the Ansonia label in 2001.

Despite her success with that genre, Ross was best known for her renditions of danzas, of which she recorded dozens, including three LP albums on the Ansonia label. Julita Ross - Danzas Vol. 1, ..Vol 2 and ..Vol 3, re-released on CD between 1997 and 2001. Other recordings included boleros such as “Noche de boda”, by Claudio Ferrer, “Bello Amanecer”, “Dos almas”, “Miedo de ti”, and others that appeared on her album, La dama de la canción, released in 1994.

The grand lady of danzas passed away 1n 1981, leaving a legacy of beautiful renditions of some of the most beloved romantic boleros and danzas of Puerto Rico and Latin America.

Discography

Julita Ross - Danzas Vol. 1 (2001)

No Me Escribas (2001)

La Borinqueña y Otras Danzas (2001)

Julita Ross - Danzas Vol. 2 (2000)

Virginia Lopez y Julita Ross (1999)

Julita Ross - Danzas Vol. 3 (1997)

Julita Ross - La Dama de la Canción (1994)

Cien Canciones (----)

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